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Post-Polio Health (ISSN 1066-5331)

Vol. 15, No. 4, Fall 1999

Read selected articles from this issue ...

Poliomyelitis, Disease Overview
Copied with permission of The United States Pharmacopeial Convention, Inc.

Incidence Rates of Poliomyelitis in the USA

The GINI Research Fund Call for Proposals

Research Updates

Post-Polio Syndrome Slide Kit

Post-Polio Bibliography

Identifying Best Practices


Identifying Best Practices

The Office of International Programs of the March of Dimes Birth Defects Foundation has convened an expert committee to plan a symposium entitled "International Conference on Post-Polio Syndrome: Identifying Best Practices in Diagnosis and Clinical Management" to be held May 19-20, 2000, in collaboration with the Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for Rehabilitation in Warm Springs, Georgia. Attendance is open to health professionals by invitation only.

The purpose of the meeting is to review and critique the current information on post-polio syndrome and to identify the best practices in diagnosis and management. The members of the committee include John Bach, MD; Neil Cashman, MD; Marinos Dalakas, MD; Lauro Halstead, MD; Joan Headley; Susan Perlman, MD; Daria Trojan, MD; and William Wendling, polio survivor. The Chair is Lewis P. Rowland, MD, Professor of Neurology, Columbia University. The lead representative from the March of Dimes is Christopher P. Howson, PhD, Director of International Programs.

The planning committee met October 8-9, 1999 and included time for polio survivors and health professionals to cite relevant data, make suggestions, and voice concerns. The committee heard from 17 individuals. Additional comments may be sent to Joan Roe, March of Dimes, 1273 Mamaroneck Avenue, White Plains, New York 10605. Materials must be received by December 31, 1999 to be considered.


Incidence Rates of Poliomyelitis in the USA

Source: Supplement to Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), Summary of Notifiable Diseases. Data from the MMWR are dependent on many factors. Severe cases are more likely to be reported. The completeness of reporting can be affected by public awareness, resources and priorities of state and local officials, and the availability of diagnostic testing and diagnostic facilities.

From 1937-1950, the USA total cases included both paralytic and nonparalytic polio:
Year Reported Cases Year Reported Cases
1937 9,514 1944 19,029
1938 1,705 1945 13,624
1939 7,343 1946 25,698
1940 9,804 1947 10,827
1941 9,086 1948 27,726
1942 4,167 1949 42,033
1943 12,450 1950 33,300
TOTAL: 226,306
From 1937-1950, the USA total cases included both paralytic and nonparalytic polio:
Year Paralytic Nonparalytic
1951 10,037 18,349
1952 21,269 36,610
1953 15,648 19,944
1954 18,308 20,168
1955 13,850 15,135
1956 7,911 7.229
1957 2,499 2.986
1958 3,697 2,090
1959 6,289 2,136
1960 2,525 665
1961 988 324
1962 792 148
1963 396 53
1964 106 16
1965 61 11
1966 106 7
1967 40 1
1968 53 0
1969 18 2
1970 31 2
1971 17 4
1972 29 2
1973 7 1
1974 7 0
1975 8 0
1976 12 2
1977 17 1
1978 9 6
1979 26 8
1980 8 1
1981 6 0
1982 8 0
1983 15 0
1984 8 0
1985 7 0
1986 8 0
1987 6 0
1988 9 0
1989 11 0
1990 6 0
1991 10 0
1992 6 0
1993 4 0
1994 8 0
1995 6 0
1996 5 0
1997 3 0
1998 1 confirmed
1999 No cases
2000 No reported cases